Transhumanism, naturally

Transhumanism, naturally

“A cyborg world would be about lived social realities in which people are not afraid of their joint kinships with animals and machines. Not afraid of permanently partial identities and contradictory standpoints.” Donna Haraway

As evidenced by popular HBO series Westworld, and local Torontonian theatrical presentations such as Tarragon’s production of Fabrizio Filippo’s The Summoned (2016), or Bad News Days Flashing Lights (2017) audiences and art makers alike are keen to investigate the changing relationship to self which is challenged by human/machine hybridity. The interface and interference of technology in our lives is often posited as destructive, distancing, dystopian such as in the popular series Black Mirror. Often, the metaphor of a machine-cyborg is used to question: “Has technology made us lose what it is to be human?” Transhumanism, naturally opens a new possibility: “Can the intra-active relationship of human and machine point us back to what is essentially human, prior to the Cartesian split between mind/body?” Using the natural world as examples of similar intra-active relationships between collectives, the show aims to prove, playfully, that the non-fixed borders of human identity in a transhumanist vision of the world has parallels in the natural world. Porous identity forming, the “permanently partial identities” that Haraway points to, exist in the natural world, and it is perhaps human hubris to imagine we’d be immune to these fusion-based constructions of ‘self.’

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The work is inspired by previous ensemble explorations on the theme entitled 'nature mystere' at Jacques Lecoq, with Hendrik Von Kramer, Alicia Gonzales, Jordi Gimeno, Sebastiano Kiniger.